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Memorial Page to Lieutenant Colonel
Clarence F. Zingheim, USMC
LtCol Clarence Zingheim was my father.  Unfortunately, I barely got a chance to know him as he died when I was 9 years old in 1980.
Clarence Zingheim (or "Zing" as he liked to be called) was a distinguished Marine Corps aviator mainly flying the F4U Corsair.  In addition to
flying with the greatest (Pappy Boyington and the Black Sheep Squadron), he got the Distinguished Flying Cross.  Other medals he received
were the Air Medal w/9*, Presidential Unit Citation w/2*, Army Distinguished Unit Emblem, American Defense Campaign Medal, American
Campaign Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal w/ 3*, World War II Victory Medal, Navy Occupation Medal, National Defense Service
Medal w/ 1*, Korean Service Medal w/5*, United Nations Service Medal, Philippine Liberation Medal, Republic of Philippines, Presidential
Unit Citation, Korean Presidential Unit Citation.  LtCol Zingheim was involved in all 3 wars: World War II (active duty), Korea (active duty)
and Vietnam (some active duty but mostly as a retired advisor).  Clarence Zingheim signed up for military service in early December, 1941,
just prior to when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor.  Some highlights of his distinguished career include that he was involved in the Chosin
Pullout, he taught counterinsurgency school with Westmoreland at Quantico in the 60s, he was also Executive Officer at MCAS Tustin.
(Above) Clarence Zingheim as a Major
(Above) Clarence Zingheim boarding plane
(Left) Article regarding Clarence Zingheim's retirement from the
Marine Corps in 1966.  This is from an October issue of the
"Flight Jacket" publication for Marine Corps Aviators.  Text is
as follows: "LtCol. Zingheim Will Retire Next Month.  LtCol.
Clarence F. Zingheim, former Executive Officer of MCAF, will
retire from active duty November 1, after 25 years' military
service.
Ltcol. Zingheim was comissioned a second lieutenant in 1942
after serving a year in the Naval Reserve.  He completed pilot
training at NAS, Corpus Christi, and received his wings as a
Naval aviator.
Since then, he has held positions as flight instructor,
maintenance officer, material officer, logistics officer,
communications officer, executive officer and commanding
officer of various units.
He first saw combat in Jan. 1945 during the Philippine
campaign.  Before the war ended he saw action in Samora
and the Riyukyus.  In 1950 he once again faced enemy action
in Korea.
His personal decorations include a Distingusihed Flying Cross,
received for actions in the Philippines and nine Air Medals.
Upon retirement, the Colonel plans to enter the farming industry
in Imperial Valley."
(Above) Photo of Clarence Zingheim
(Above) Photo of my father and I taken in the early 1970s
Though I hardly got a chance to know the man that was my father, I can understand
how difficult it must be for people who lose their parents when they're young children.
I often find myself asking questions such as what he might have done in a given
situation or what his interests or preferences were.  In the end, the best I was able to
do was gather as much of the information as I could about him and that's all I can do.

Clarence Zingheim died of a heart attack in San Diego in February 1980 at the age of
62.

This page is a tribute to the man that was my father and his service to our country.
"Semper Fi"
(above) April 1966 photo
LtCol Clarence F. Zingheim pictured at left
Movies playing in the San Diego area
the week my father died in February 1980...
Songs popular in Billboard
the week my father died in February, 1980...
1. "Rock with You" by Michael Jackson
2. "Do That to Me One More Time" by Captain & Tennile
3. "Coward of the County" by Kenny Rogers
4. "Cruisin'" by Smokey Robinson
5. "Crazy Little Thing Called Love" by Queen
6. "Yes, I'm Ready" by Teri DeSario with K.C.
7. "Sara" by Fleetwood Mac
8. "The Long Run" by the Eagles
9. "Longer" by Dan Fogelberg
10. "Don't Do Me Like That" by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers
11. "This Is It" by Kenny Loggins
12. "Escape (The Pina Colada Song)" by Rupert Holmes